LCL

[Week 5 Reflection] Playful Quotes


#43

They build Hogwarts Castle from Harry Potter, or they build the Millennium Falcon from Star Wars. After they finish building, they put their finished model on display on a shelf in their room. These children are playing in the LEGO playpen, not the LEGO playground. They are learning how to follow instructions, but they aren’t developing to their full potential as creative thinkers.

The above quote (bold added for emphasis) really stood out for me because the experience I had as a child playing was more geared towards playground vs playpen play which seems more prevalent today.

I believe this is primarily due to the pressure for LEGO to tie in with movie/game IP to maximize profits. Many of the themed kits available (Minecraft, Batman, Harry Potter, etc) allow you to build objects or sets from their respective franchises by carefully following instructions but are limited in the range of creative possibility as a result.

As parents/consumers it’s up to us to make the right choices and sometimes that means a bucket of assorted LEGO bricks is a better choice than the nicely packaged and well marketed movie/game tie-in products kids gravitate towards.


#44

“In recent years, children have started spending more of their playtime on computer screens.
This opens new opportunities for creative play and creative learning,”

I think that students can learn to program is a good way to know that with computers you can do more than just play. Programming opens up a world of possibilities for them to develop their skills and creativity.and this vision can exten to they parents
I


#45

Me gusta “parque de juegos”, un lugar donde los niños pueden imaginar y jugar con creatividad, espacios amplios para desarrollarse. Creo importante que el parque o el espacio amplio esté en su mente, no limitarlos a un plan estructurado, como suele suceder con nuestras planificaciones de cada semana.

Cambiaría mi forma de enseñar usando el enfoqueque compartido en este curso.

Gracias pensadores!!!


#46

“These children are playing in the LEGO playpen, not the LEGO playground. They are learning how to follow instructions, but they aren’t developing to their full potential as creative thinkers.”

Wow! My kids have always followed the LEGO instructions and never thought to use the pieces to tinker with other ideas! That really hit home.


#47

I’m a game designer by profession so for me the theme of Play has a lot of meanings
I was surprised at first by the emphasis of Thinkering as a proxy for play but I understand where the LCL comes from with that
I have been thinking quite a bit about how to reinforce the “creative playful learning” part of games I work on and one of the most important learnings Igot from reading the different references and also everyone’s comments is one of the key qualities of good “thinkering material”

Good material can be easily combined and disassembled

the “snappy” propreties of any material has to go both ways so errors can be made and improved on quickly
I have been thinking about how to apply this idea to more abstract creative material such as story writing or complex systems like social simulations
the scratch programming language has that property at is core
very popular creative games such as minecraft have the same properties
they identified the core building blocks for what they wanted to allow
what would be the core building blocks of a story?
words and sentences are an easy answer but I think they relate more to colors or variables in minecraft of scratch for instance. They are too “low level”. Too close to the details and not close enough to the end goal "making a functional story"
The core building blocks used in these two examples allow for a quick and intuitive first draft that “works”

the actantial model is as close to a building block as I can think of but again it is still very abstract. I feel something between the sentence and the actantial model could be a good start… just need to find a fun “block” to play with!
anyway, just wanted to share my thought process
maybe someone will have fun ideas to bounce with me?


#48

Greetings:

All creative process is fascinating and through it, we resemble or differentiate relationships, in all areas, with the world.

In the learning processes creativity is a strength derived from difference, understood as the ability to propose other alternatives to those established without underestimating them. My conceptual coincidence ‘of vision’ with Mitch’s proposal is:

… the game not as an activity but as an attitude, a way of interacting with the world, always ready to try new things, experiment, test the limits, take risks …

Choosing this appointment is coinciding with ‘reflecting’ as an explorer of new alternatives, of enjoying the passion of risk and of experimenting by testing the limits; which is, in short, the attitude to enjoy life broadly from resemblance to difference with reciprocity.

This shared vision encourages you to continue exploring learning as the opportunity to enjoy more, to allow yourself to do more and to do more from the difference, from other places not common, from your creativity and from the question:

How to help children develop a playful attitude and a playful approach to everything they do in the world?

Thank you for your reading and I reiterate my desire for wellness.


#49

I think teachers/mentors/parents should develop a playful attitude and a playful approach, like little kids in kindergarten.


#50

“A playpen is a restrictive environment. In actual playpens, children have limited room to move and limited opportunities to explore … In contrast, a playground provides children with more room to move, explore, experiment, and collaborate.”

I, like many others - apparently, found meaning in the play pen, playground distinction. When I was a teacher, I often gave students play pen experiences and wondered why they were not emerging with the expected results. I though I was giving young people opportunities to play, but I was really just providing them with more of the same with an attempted disguise of playing. Young minds suss out this tactic really fast and creativity in thinking is really emphasized more through a playground approach.


#51

"We need to provide children with more opportunities to tinker, with both physical and digital materials. The tinkering process can be messy and meandering, but this is true of all creative processes. A careful plan can lead to efficient results , but you can’t plan your way to creativity. Creative thinking grows out of creative tinkering’ page 139
I keep thinking of my 10 year old nephew Connor who sold his Halloween candy back to his mom so that he could buy tubes from Amazon.com He has been a tinkerer as long as I can remember. His livingroom is filled with hot glue guns, scissor, tape, wires and any recycled material he can claim as his own. At the moment he is working on a hand that is controlled by air syringes. I watched him create and recreate, tear down his model and redo it over and over. When I left, I knew that there were going to be several iterations of the design before it came even close to being done. In fact he is never done with anything. In it’s final stages, it becomes the spark for the next project that grows out of it. He works alone at times, but has a group of friends that give him feedback and ideas and work on his projects with him once or twice a week. This passion for tinkering is so strong that there isn’t a day that goes by when he is not making something and if he’s not making something, he’s thinking of something to make or design. Fortunately he is in a home where his need to go to the city dump to get ‘stuff’ and to develop his tinkering interests is always (almost always!) supported. What actions does it inspire you to do? The [quote=“raine22, post:51, topic:498, full:true”]
"We need to provide children with more opportunities to tinker, with both physical and digital materials. The tinkering process can be messy and meandering, but this is true of all creative processes. A careful plan can lead to efficient results , but you can’t plan your way to creativity. Creative thinking grows out of creative tinkering’ page 139
I keep thinking of my 10 year old nephew Connor who sold his Halloween candy back to his mom so that he could buy tubes from Amazon.com He has been a tinkerer as long as I can remember. His livingroom is filled with hot glue guns, scissor, tape, wires and any recycled material he can claim as his own. At the moment he is working on a hand that is controlled by air syringes. I watched him create and recreate, tear down his model and redo it over and over. When I left, I knew that there were going to be several iterations of the design before it came even close to being done. In fact he is never done with anything. In it’s final stages, it becomes the spark for the next project that grows out of it. He works alone at times, but has a group of friends that give him feedback and ideas and work on his projects with him once or twice a week. This passion for tinkering is so strong that there isn’t a day that goes by when he is not making something and if he’s not making something, he’s thinking of something to make or design. Fortunately he is in a home where his need to go to the city dump to get ‘stuff’ and to develop his tinkering interests is always (almost always!) supported.
What actions does the quote inspire me to do? Be sure to give students time for creative tinkering so that they will develop their creative thinking skills.

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#52

I chose “It’s also important to provide learners with sufficient time, because some paths and styles take longer than others.” from Mitch’s Chapter 5. This resonated with me because I am one of those learners that really needs to take the time to experiment and try things out before I choose the path that I want to go down. Often time in school, I see expectations that a certain project will take a set amount of time to complete. This is usually driven by the many demands of our curriculum schedules.
I think this quote reminds us that we need to step back an allow more time for richer learning experiences where student can really take the time to follow their interests.


#53

Dear Ishiguro @IshiguroTatsuya

It’s nice to receive your valuable contribution. Thanks for working on writing. I agree with your assessment. Hug and congratulations for your Tinker website. An Awesome virtual space for japan kids. Please keep in touch…

¡ASOBU!
アソブ


#54

I cannot pick a particular quote because this whole excerpt spoke to me, which is probably related to the fact that this was one of my most important P’s.

Early this year while defending our school’s Makerspace against our Administration’s misunderstandings, we literally were told “but they are just tinkering.” We then had to explain that tinkering was one of our vocabulary words that we were working on developing (our Makerspace is centered around English Language Learners ELL). We were explicitly teaching about tinkering, explaining how tinkering is embedded in Indigenous Pedagogy, and providing an opportunity for students to tinker.

I was inspired by this excerpt to include a tinkering opportunity in each term with the focus being on a different aspect of what tinkering can teach us. Our first term our tinkering assignment was giving the students a box of materials and asking them to build something using only those materials. It didn’t matter what it was, but you were limited by supplies. This was to focus their creativity, and to have them adapt their ideas to the the supplies provided. Next term I was thinking the tinkering project could be to give the students a project idea to build, but then stop them half way and change the idea and see who can adapt their projects to the new specifications. I know that this will be difficult for many of our students, but it provides us with an opportunity to explicitly teach about flexibility, adaptation, and incorporating new ideas. I will wait to see how that goes before we come up with a tinkering idea for our 3rd term :smile:

Reading this excerpt also brought to mind a video I watched on Youtube by Peter Brown

This is essentially how I understand the patterners (detail oriented makers) vs. dramatists (big picture makers). I fall more into the dramatists (big picture maker) category, but I do definitely have some characteristics of the patterners. Both myself and the other Makerspace teacher are big picture makers, but because MakerED focuses so much on design thinking, last year we were forcing our students to be detail oriented makers. This year we are designing projects throughout the year that rotate through these styles or can be completed using either style.


#55

Thank you for your warm comment!
I think you’re a playful person.
Kids will be more playful when they collaborate with people like you!

¡muchas gracias!


#56

“Dramatists and tinkerers often get the message that math and science aren’t for them. It doesn’t have to be that way. The problem isn’t in the disciplines themselves, but in how they’re presented and taught.”

I liked this quote as it leads to questioning how we present tasks and learning to our students and some of the problems that exist with our current structure of schooling. So often each class has 80-90 minutes for a task to be introduced and completed in its own little box of curriculum. Is there really enough room for students to learn in a way that best fits them and is relevant and purposeful to their interests and goals?

This course has been forcing me to tinker with my own thoughts on education. :wink:


#57

@IshiguroTatsuya

あなたに会うことは喜びです。私はまた、他人を助けることに専念しているあなたのような人々がいることをうれしく思います。一緒に勉強し続けることができればと思っています。

私の日本人はどう思いますか? :wink:

あなたのウェブサイトとあなたの専門的な仕事が本当に好きでした。

あなたのための抱擁と祝福

¡ASOBU!

It’s a pleasure to meet you and I’m also glad that there are people like you who are dedicated to helping others. I hope we can keep in touch and continue learning together.

What do you think my Japanese? :wink:

I really liked your website and your professional work, when you can visit my website in:

A hug and blessings for you.


#58

Sorry for being late in this conversation. My favorite quote is:
"Learners differ from one another in many ways: Some are patterners, others are dramatists; some are planners, others are tinkerers; some prefer to express themselves through text, others through images. Many people wonder whether these differences result from nature or nurture— that is, whether styles are inborn or based on experience in the world. For me, that’s not the most interesting or important issue. Rather, we should focus on figuring out ways to help all children, of all backgrounds and learning styles, reach their full potential. "
I think it is important to remember that some children (people) need to be allowed to be patterners and we must not go too much in the other direction when we want to support the tinkerers and give them space and time. I also liked the point "It’s also important to provide learners with sufficient time, because some paths and styles take longer than others. " We must as teachers or mentors remember the versatility of our learners and meet them where they need to be met and with the support they need.


#59

“Play” videos and readings introduced me to several new ideas:

As educators, we have to find the type of play which is “hard fun” and helps young people develop as creative thinkers. Thus, we need to support all types of learning styles.

We need to design learning activities that engage children in building, creating and experimenting.

“Take advantage of the unexpected, it is an opportunity for new explorations.”

“We need to provide children with more opportunities to tinker, with both physical and digital materials.”

Based on the above ideas, I think that I should reconsider some of my teaching approaches and provide learners with sufficient time and activities that support many styles.


#60

Tinkering disposition

The quote: “Engage, get stuck, and play with a problem until you come around to a deeper understanding”

This phrase goes directly to the door of my refrigerator, not only because I think it captures playfully the essence of the tinkering process, but also in its imperative wording invites a way of knowing, doing and being that in fact, led me to an aha! moment: children are the best tinkerers in the world and creative learning, a biological characteristic of all of us. Then, I also understood with greater depth and extension the idea that contains the term Life long kindergarten.
Renata Meirelles, Brazilian pedagogue, mentions that the game is the gateway to the world for children to make their own discoveries, whose main importance is to subvert objects and transform them into toys, for example, when the cardboard box becomes a submarine, a ruler and a pair of crayons on an airplane, the cushions of the room in a fort. When a child resignifies an object, creation occurs, resulting in learning, transformation, invention without judgment … something new! This is one of the main characteristics or skills deliberately practiced in tinkering.
In my experience derived from working with many parents of children and adolescents, there was not one of them who did not mention creativity as a fundamental quality that should be nurtured and valued in the process of parenting and education. However, paradoxically, in our formal educational structures and environments we tend not to understand and even limit creativity.
In her participation in the documentary “The Beggining of Life” (2016), Pia Rebello Britto, Chief and Senior Advisor at Early Childhood Development program of UNICEF, mentioned that based on a statistical study it was shown that once they enter primary school, children reduce their ability to find creative solutions by 50% or more, demonstrating that children think creatively and freely until they enter a system that tells them how and what to think.
I believe we are in a very exciting time in education, since in light of better understanding our learning processes, we are faced with the opportunity to change the purposes and objectives of educational systems, which are nothing more than a reflection of what we understand. .
I leave with the personal task of allowing me to write down my ideas, no matter how crazy, impossible or unhinged they seem, and ruminating on another quote in the reading of Karen Wilkinson and Mike Petrich:
"We were both lucky enough that we were given permission to get messy, find out for ourselves, and try out crazy ideas just for the sake of experience-and allowed to get lost in the woods and in our own imaginations."
With this quote I confirm one of the main reasons and inspirations of my work, however small it may be, to contribute to the arrival of a day when no child, no person in general, should ask permission to discover for themselves.

I would like to include the Phil Hansen’s talk on Ted. I think it shows in a very interesting way how an adult tinkerer thinks, works and lives.


#61

“Tinkering is at the intersection of making and playing, and I see it as one of the most important pathways to developing as a creative thinker.” I really like this quote and there is a lot to unpack here. The first part of the quote connects making, playing and tinkering. It sort of summarizes this chapter about play. It shows us that tinkering is the main goal of creative play. This also brings in the other chapters as well. Making and playing also involve passion and projects are tightly entwined with this. The last part of the quote is the goal of this learning. In order to develop creative thinkers and learners were need to encourage people to become tinkerers by providing opportunities to make and play. This has already inspired my teaching. Instead of jumping in to solve something for a student, I stand back and allow them to tinker for a while. This allows me to observe where the student ultimately takes their project and allows the student for greater learning.


#62

I liked this quote “…scientists do a lot more tinkering than they describe in their papers.”

this is very true where scientists applying playground way when they discover new things, they think and explore, use different ways and test more and more (overlapping process) until they reach to new useful thing that helps humanity, So they do a lot of tinkering more than they describe in their papers.